David Hill, PhD on citizen science and studying snow

David Hill, PhD on citizen science and studying snow

David Hill is a professor at Oregon State University and a National Geographic Explorer. No matter the hemisphere, if it is spring time, you’ll find him out on skis sampling the snow between mountain summit and trailhead. For over 25 years, he has studied how water behaves from snowy mountain headwaters to coastal environments. David joins us to talk about how we can use citizen science to study snow.

Watch David’s talk:

 

More resources:

Snow science interactive map:

Check out this map of California and Nevada to learn details about recent snowmelt and more. David’s suggestions:

1. Play around with toggling on the ’swe data.’ You can show actual values, changes, percent of normal, and so on.

2. Play around with National Gridded Data. This is a computer model, at a coarse 1 km scale. With CSO, we try to run models on a 25 meter scale or so.
Engage in your own citizen science:

You can contribute to projects like David’s through sharing your own snow depth data. Check out Mountain Hub to get involved.

Learn more about David’s research:

To read some of David’s published articles and academic work, click here

Extension projects:

Check out the data nuggets project below to help turn this episode into a longer unit:

Kelly Loria on mountain stream health

Kelly Loria on mountain stream health

Kelly is a PhD candidate in the Natural Resources and Environmental Science Program at the University of Nevada, Reno working with Dr. Joanna Blaszczak. Her background is in alpine lake ecology having led a team monitoring the alpine lakes in the Green Lakes Valley of Colorado. Her recent research interests include investigating patterns of metabolism and nutrient uptake by algal communities of mountain streams in Lake Tahoe Basin.

Watch Kelly’s Talk:

 

More resources:

Learn more about stream ecology: Check out the Univervsity of Nevada Reno’s Dept. Of Natural Resources and Environmental Science website.

Related article: in Kelly’s talk above you learned about the role of nitrates in water. In this article published by Kelly’s faculty advisor Dr. Joanna Blaszczak, you can learn more about how stormwater runoff and nitrates are related.

Using drones for conservation work with Eben Broadbent, PhD

Using drones for conservation work with Eben Broadbent, PhD

Eben N. Broadbent, PhD, is an assistant professor of forest ecology & geomatics in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation at the University of Florida, with a PhD in Biology (Ecology & Evolution) from Stanford University. He is the co-founder of the Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab (SEPC) at the University of Florida, where his focus is on using Gator Eye, a drone that’s also an unmanned flying laboratory, to further conservation efforts.

Watch Eben’s Talk:

 

More resources:

Learn more about spatial ecology: Check out the Univervsity of Florida’s Spatial Ecology and Conservation (SPEC) lab co-founded by Eben

Data set: these data sets were collected by Eben Broadbant and his wife Almeyda Zambrano. They can be used for students looking to create a research project, learn data analysis, or used as scripts in R for spatial analyses.

Melissa Hill on Land Conservation

Melissa Hill on Land Conservation

Melissa Hill grew up in central Florida and has been involved with land conservation since 2014. She graduated from the University of Florida with a master’s in Interdisciplinary Ecology from the School of Natural Resources and Environment and a certificate in Environmental Education and Communication. Since August 2019, she has served as the land acquisition specialist and project coordinator for the Santa Fe River Basin watershed where she manages a regional partnership, works with private property owners, and facilitates permanent land protection. On an off day she can be found catching a sunrise or out paddling Florida’s springs and rivers.

Watch Melissa’s Talk:

 

More resources:

Learn more about land conservation in the gulf of Mexico area: these two resources talk about specific conservation efforts in Melissa’s study area (central Florida and the surrounding area).

Related articles: check out these related resources on land conseration in North America.

Keely Rodriguez on disease in frogs

Keely Rodriguez on disease in frogs

Keely Rodriguez is a PhD student at the University of Nevada Reno in the Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology department. She has worked with many endangered species including fish, sea turtles, and frogs. Currently, she studies frog immune systems to see how they react to deadly diseases. Hear all about her research live in this talk.

Watch Keely’s Talk:

 

More resources:

More on conservation biology: learn more about what a conservation biologist does by browsing Keely’s website, or check out the Voyles Lab website where Keely studies at UNR. 

Read a recent article: check out this article by Keely Rodriguez and Jamie Voyles detailing their work on frogs with chiytridiomicosis published this year.